Computing

Year 7 Computing Curriculum

Main topics covered:

  • E-Safety
  • Spreadsheets
  • Data representation (Binary)
  • Computer programming

Main knowledge, understanding and skills to develop:

All pupils will have an understanding of what personal information is and where and it is appropriate to share it. They will know the agencies to go to if need arises.  Pupils will be introduced to Spreadsheet terminology such as a cell, row and column.  They will learn how to enter data, formulas and functions in and use these to create simple models. They will be able to use these models to answer “what-if” questions.  Pupils will understand the basics of computer hardware. They will gain further understanding of how computer transfer information through the use of binary. Pupils will know how the binary system works and how it can be translated into a form that we can understand.  Pupils will gain an understanding of computer programmes and will be able to plan a set of instructions to solve a given problem. They will be introduced, through the programme Scratch, how to manipulate an object on the screen and plan, design and build a simple computer game.

Homework is planned to be set once every 2 weeks depending on the progress made during the lesson. During the programming unit of work, pupils will have the opportunity of continuing with their programme on Scratch if they have an online account.

Assessment of pupils’ understanding and progress could take different forms depending on the topic. In the main topics, pupils build up a product during the topic and complete an evaluation at the end of the topic. Both these will be used to assess pupil’s progress.

Year 8 Computing Curriculum

Main topics covered:

  • My Digital World
  • Hardware
  • Databases
  • Micro:bit
  • Webpage Design
  • Introduction to Pseudocode
  • Computer Programming

Main knowledge, understanding and skills to develop:

Pupils will learn about what to look for in websites when deciding if they are trustworthy or not and practice evaluating a range of websites for trustworthiness and reliability. Also they will learn about how search engines work and techniques for searching smarter that reduce search results and increasing their relevance. Also learn about the Copyright Law and understand how to use other peoples’ ideas/work without breaking copyright law. Pupils will be made aware of many dangers that are online and learn how to stay clear of these dangers. Finally, pupils will learn about cyber abuse and what they can do to combat cyber abuse.

Pupils will learn about the basic structure of a computer system, from the main components, input and output devices, to the individual components inside a computer and their functions. Finally they will learn how data is transferred through the introduction of binary.

Pupils will learn about creating and using relational databases. They will learn how to create a table, form, query, report and a main menu. They need to solve a problem using basic and advanced queries.

Pupils will learn about the basic coding concepts using a BBC micro:bit, such as variables, types, procedures, iteration, and conditionals. Solving problems with the BBC micro:bit will expose pupils to computational thinking skills, such as abstraction, decomposition, pattern matching, algorithm design, and data representation.

Pupils learn how to use Serif WebPlus to create a website. The will learn about what makes a good and not-so-good website. They will learn about how to insert text, images, roll over images, hyperlinks, buttons and image hot spots on a website.

Pupils will learn some programming techniques using Python. Pupils will learn about variables, console programmes, IF statements and While loops.

Homework is planned to be set once every 2 weeks depending on the progress made during the lesson. During the programming unit of work, pupils will have the opportunity of continuing with their programme on Scratch if they have an online account.

Assessment of pupils’ understanding and progress could take different forms depending on the topic. In the main topics, pupils build up a product during the topic and complete an evaluation at the end of the topic. Both these will be used to assess pupil’s progress.

Year 9 Computing Curriculum

Main topics covered:

  • E-Safety
  • Computer Crime and Cyber Security
  • Programming with Python
  • Data Representation
  • Photoshop
  • Creating a model using a Spreadsheet

Main knowledge, understanding and skills to develop:

All pupils will have an understanding of the potential risks of using emails and the internet and how to protect themselves from potential threats such as viruses, trojan horses and computer worms.

With this understanding, pupils plan and create a poster and leaflet about the impact of these threats and give advice on how to avoid them.

Pupils will learn about legal safeguards regarding computer use, including overviews of the Computer Misuse Act, Data Protection Act and Copyright Law and their implications for computer use. Phishing scams and other email frauds, hacking, “data harvesting” and identity theft are discussed together with ways of protecting online identity and privacy. Health and Safety Law and environmental issues such as the safe disposal of old computers are also discussed.

Pupils revisit computer programming from Year 8, but learn how to create variables, functions, understand different data types, how to design a windows form and how to assign code to various components.

The pupils will gain further understanding of how computer transfer information through the use of binary, denary, hexadecimal, bitmaps and sound files.

Pupils will learn how to edit images using simple Photoshop techniques and understand the uses of Photoshop and why it is used in the industry.

Pupils will gain knowledge and understanding of how to create a model using a spreadsheet. They will be able to use a variety of different formulas and built-in functions, including formula that link different sheets. They will know how to validate data that is entered and use various formatting techniques including conditional formatting.

Homework is planned to be set once every 2 weeks depending on the progress made during the lesson. During the programming unit of work, pupils will have the opportunity of continuing with their programme on Scratch if they have an online account.

Assessment of pupils’ understanding and progress could take different forms depending on the topic. In the main topics, pupils build up a product during the topic and complete an evaluation at the end of the topic. Both these will be used to assess pupil’s progress.

KS4 GCSE Computer Science (9-1)

This GCSE gives students an excellent opportunity to investigate how computers work and how they are used to develop computer programming and problem-solving skills.  Students will do some in-depth research and practical work.

The course will:

  • Give learners a real, in-depth understanding of how computer technology works
  • Provide excellent preparation for higher study and employment in Computer Science
  • Develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills

Students will:

  • Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies, understanding of how they work and apply this knowledge and understanding in a range of contexts
  • Acquire and apply a knowledge, some technical skills and an understanding of the use of algorithms in computer programs to solve problems using programming
  • Use their knowledge and understanding of computer technology to become independent and discerning users of IT, able to make informed decisions about the use and be aware of the implications of different technologies
  • Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of IT in a range of contexts
  • Develop computer programs to solve problems
  • Develop the skills to work collaboratively
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and the impact of and issues related to the use of computer technology in society

How is the course organised?

The course consists of 3 units of work which are assessed by two written papers and one non-exam assessment (20 hours).

Component 01 – Computer Systems (Written Paper—50% of total GCSE)

  • Systems Architecture
  • Memory
  • Storage
  • Wired and wireless networks
  • Network topologies, protocols and layers
  • System security
  • System software
  • Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns

Component 02 – Computational Thinking, Algorithms and Programming (Written Paper—50% of total GCSE)

  • Algorithms
  • Programming techniques
  • Producing robust programs
  • Computational logic
  • Translators and facilities of languages
  • Data representation

Component 03 – Programming Project (Non-Exam Assessment—20 hours)

The programming project will require students to design, code and test a solution to three tasks using a suitable programming language.

KS4 ICT

All Year 10 pupils will be studying the Level 2 Certificate in Digital Applications (CiDA).

CiDA is a GCSE equivalent qualification that focusses on practical and creative IT skills. The course is composed of two units of work.

Unit 1 is a mandatory Web Design unit which all students do. This focusses on the skills needed to design and create a web site for a specific client, following a brief. Pupils learn how to use Serif Webplus – web design package used in industry – as well as image editing software to create web content. The unit is assessed in an on-screen examination in January and June of Year 11.

The other unit is on Artwork and Imaging. This unit aims to give pupils the skills to use the tools and techniques provided by artwork and imaging software to design and create effective graphic products for specified purposes and audiences. They will investigate a range of graphic products to find out how images are used to convey a particular message. They will discover that they like some of these products more than others and will need to consider why this is the case. Once pupils have a good understanding of the possibilities offered by artwork and imaging, they will learn how to produce images that communicate effectively onscreen and in print and how to combine them with other components to produce graphic products. They will need to consider the medium, purpose and audience as well as file format and size. Pupils will demonstrate their ability to create effective images and graphic products through their work on a major project set by the exam board. This will include exhibiting work and supporting evidence in an e-portfolio.

Students in ICT are continually assessed in lessons. The digital nature of the on-screen work means that teachers are able to easily see what a student is doing and give them on-going feedback as they progress through the tasks in a unit of work. Additionally, students are assessed on the work they have done at the end of each sub-unit and given feedback on their successes and how they can further improve. Assessment for the qualification itself is in two parts: Unit 1 (Web Authoring) makes up 25% of the award and is assessed in a single 2.5 hour on-screen examination in Year 11. Unit 3 (Artwork and Imaging) making up the remaining 75% of the award as a coursework unit, internally assessed and externally moderated.

OCR Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia –

Creative and Digital Media plays an important part in many areas of our everyday lives and is also an important part of the UK economy. There is a demand from employers for an increasingly skilled and technically literate workforce as more and more media products are produced digitally. For example, watching a movie trailer on YouTube will persuade us to go and watch the movie, listening to a podcast on the latest iPhone will influence us to purchase the phone or even purchasing a new game after playing a small online sample.  Businesses nowadays pay huge amounts of money to people who can develop websites, video/radio adverts, animations and games. Creative iMedia provides you with specific and transferable skills and a solid foundation in understanding and applying this subject, whether it is in employment or higher education.

The first two modules are mandatory; these are followed by two optional units.

Module 1: Pre-production skills (R081: external exam – 1 hour 15 mins – 25%)

Planning is an essential part of working in the creative and digital media sector. This unit will enable students to understand pre-production skills and techniques used in the sector, as well as gain the knowledge and skills to create digital media products and explore their application. It will also develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process.

Content includes:

  • Understanding the purpose and content of pre-production
  • Being able to plan pre-production
  • Being able to produce and review pre-production documents

Module 2: Creating digital graphics (R082: Coursework based task (OCR moderated) – 10 hours – 25%)

Digital graphics feature in many areas of our lives, and play a very important part in today’s world. The digital media sector relies heavily on these visual stimulants within products to communicate messages effectively. The aim of this unit is for students to understand the basics of digital graphics editing for the creative and digital media sector. This unit builds on Unit R081.

Content includes:

  • Understanding the purpose and properties of digital graphics and knowing where and how they are used
  • Being able to plan the creation of a digital graphic
  • Having the knowledge to create new digital graphics, using a range of editing techniques
  • Being able to review a digital graphic against a specific brief

Modules 3 & 4: Optional Units (Two to be chosen by teacher – coursework based task (OCR moderated) – 10 hours – 25% each)

  • Creating 2D and 3D digital characters
  • Creating a digital sound sequence
  • Storytelling with a comic strip
  • Creating a digital video sequence
  • Creating a multi-page website
  • Creating a digital animation
  • Creating interactive multimedia products
  • Digital photography
  • Designing a game concept
  • Developing digital games